Category: Art World News

01
Nov

Shock over closure of Inverleith House

After almost 60 years, the stunning and beloved Inverleith House has closed its doors. As a groundbreaking centre for international contemporary art, Inverleith has shown more Turner Prize winning artists than any other U.K gallery aside from the Tate. Yet, the sudden closure of the space has occurred without consultation or prior warning.

Royal Botanical Gardens Edinburgh have remained tight-lipped on the reasons for the move or plans for the future, although many have voiced suspicions that the house is destined for use as office space or even a wedding venue. If this is the case it is easy to see why some are dubbing the move ‘cultural vandalism’, with exhibited artists including James Turrell, Andy Goldsworthy and Martin Creed, as well as Matisse, Picasso and Henry Moore it’s easy to see how this conclusion has been drawn by the majority. Douglas Gordon has been quoted as saying the closure is “the most myopic decision that any forward-thinking administration could possibly make. Bang goes the Enlightenment–roll on the Dark Ages!”.

Since the news was announced the following surge of opinion has prompted widespread hope that there is a compromise to be made, and that this iconic venue will not be lost forever. Culture secretary Fiona Hyslop, plans to meet with RBGE and Culture Scotland in an attempt to discuss funding issues and reach a positive resolution. In the meantime the petition against the closure is  still gaining signatures.

You can sign the petition against the closure here.

 

17
Oct

Mtec proud sponsors of Hepworth Prize for Sculpture

This week sees the opening of the first accompanying exhibition of the Hepworth Prize for Sculpture, a new biennial award to recognise talent in contemporary British sculpture. Set to be one of the most important accolades of Contemporary Art in the UK, the award is a fitting legacy to Barbara Hepworth and champions those at any stage of their artistic career.

Mtec are proud to be one of the supporting sponsors for the Prize and contribute towards the future recognition of contemporary sculpture within the UK, something which is an integral part of our cultural heritage.

This year’s four shortlisted artists are, Phyllida Barlow, Steven Claydon, Helen Marten and David Medalla. The winner will be announced on Thursday 17th November and we will be tweeting live from the event (@mtec0).

You can view this years work at the Hepworth Wakefield from Friday 21st October 2016 – Sunday 19th February 2017. For more information visit the Hepworth Wakefield website.

10
Oct

Mtec recommends – October 2016…

Frieze has been and gone but this Autumn still has some stunning exhibitions on offer. Here’s our pick of October’s shows:

Sep, 27  – Jan, 2 2016 Tate Britain – Turner Prize 2016

This year’s Turner Prize nominees are Michael Dean, Anthea Hamilton, Helen Marten, and Josephine Pryde. The exhibition has been well-received and is well worth a visit before the Prize’s temporary move to Hull in 2017.


Sep, 30  – Nov, 6 2016 White Cube Bermondsey – Antony Gormley: Fit

Gormley plays with the gallery space in this sequel to his 2012 show ‘Model’, creating a labyrinth in 15  chambers through which the viewer must navigate. This is set to be an iconic show of 2016.Continue Reading…

04
Oct

Ai Weiwei @ Museum of Baalbek

Earlier in September some of our Project Managers travelled to Lebanon to install Ai Weiwei’s ‘Foundation’ at the Museum of Baalbek. The new installation is part of a group show at the prestigious archaeological site called ‘The Silent Echo’, and features Susan Hiller, Theo Mercier, Marwan Rechmaoui, Paola Yacoub, Cynthia Zaven among others. Curated by Karina El Helou and organised in conjunction with Studio Cur/art, the show looks at the importance of on-site Museums and explores in the context of Baalbek, how monuments and artifacts become symbols of an obsolete past, subject to destruction during war and victims of iconoclasm.Continue Reading…

04
Oct

A busy month for our Viewing Rooms…

We’ve been working hard to prepare our state-of-the-art Viewing Room facility for the busy month ahead. October brings Frieze and FIAC, and with them a great opportunity for clients to view artworks in our stunning setting within a short drive of Central London (10mins/3 miles from M25 and 25mins from Liverpool St Station). We also hope to support some of October’s most exciting exhibitions offering an extension to the public gallery spaces where clients can view additional relevant works in a private setting at a time convenient to them.
Our purpose-built viewing rooms offer the space, expertise and facilities to accommodate large-
scale pieces where, smaller, Central London spaces may be otherwise be restricted.Continue Reading…

26
Sep

Turner Prize 2016

This week sees the opening of this year’s Turner Prize exhibition. Opening to the public on Tuesday, the show promises to be just as controversial as expected given this years nominees (which you can read more about here), and has already been given mixed reviews by the press.

Exhibits include Josephine Pryde’s train which had been open for visitors to ride on at previous exhibitions, but sits stationary in the Tate due to “leaves on the line”. Anthea Hamilton’s “Project for a door”, this year’s “poster boy” for the Prize, is one of many dominating sculptures in the exhibition.  With a title illustrative of the sculpture’s political statement, Michael Dean’s room full of pennies (“United Kingdom poverty line for two adults and two children: twenty thousand four hundred and thirty six pounds sterling as published on 1 September 2016.”) is another stand-out piece. The final nominee, Helen Marten, has further created works which prompt interaction with the gallery’s visitors by encouraging them to view her sculptures as if they were archaeologists, exploring the materials and discovering new insights.

This year’s Prize is open from Sep 27 – Jan 2 with the winner being announced on Dec 5.

To read more about the Prize, nominees and exhibition visit the Tate website.

09
Sep

Mtec Recommends… September 2016

The Autumn is upon us, and that means the busiest time of the year in the Art Calendar. Here’s our pick of September’s shows:

Sep, 8  – Oct, 22 2016 Marian Goodman Gallery – Giuseppe Penone: Fui, Sarò, Non Sono (I was, I will be, I am not)

Part of a two part exhibition, with a simultaneous show in Paris, the London element of Penone’s shows presents work which explore the relationship between the artist’s body and his surrounding ecosystem.


Sept, 15 – Dec, 17 2016 Gagosian, Mayfair – Richard Serra: DrawingsContinue Reading…

31
Aug

Several tons of lead stolen from Kiefer Studio

Anselm Kiefer has fallen victim to lead thieves for a second time. Burglars dismantled a large work, comprised of 10 tons of lead and 12 tons of marble, in the artist’s workshop in Croissy-Beaubourg. Although the value of the artwork far exceeds the value of the raw materials, the thieves made away with lead valued at over 1500EUR per ton. Despite security and police presence, they were succeeded by another group of opportunists who were apprehended leaving the area with leftover metal from the scene.Continue Reading…

30
Aug

Poignant installation at Chatsworth House

The stunning grounds of Chatsworth House have been transformed as part of the 11th annual ‘Beyond Limits’ show in collaboration with Sotheby’s. The contemporary, outdoor sculpture show is a highlight of the art calendar, and this year has a poignant centrepiece in the form of ‘Lilas’; the Serpentine Pavillion designed by the late Dame Zaha Hadid.

Continue Reading…

17
Aug

Hackney Wick Artists’ stronghold under threat

More than 100 artists and small businesses stand to lose their studios to make way for a pedestrian bridge across the adjacent canal. Vittoria Wharf in Hackney Wick is due to be demolished by developers who plan to build additional homes in the area once the bridge is in place. Hackney Wick has long been the epicentre of Contemporary Art in London, with the Chapman Brothers, Gavin Turk and others basing themselves in the area, along with many fabricators, storage facilities and transport companies. The move has been described by developers as one which will enhance the area and help to further develop a community which has blossomed since the area’s regeneration to coincide with the Olympics. However, those who oppose the plans for eviction and demolition (some 2,500 have so far signed a petition) argue that demolishing the Wharf on this basis is, by definition, removing the very community which it intends to enhance.

Continue Reading…